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Mizzou Mail

Hurrah for Marching Mizzou

Anyone who attended the Homecoming game Oct. 24, 2009, surely must join me in thanking our wonderful Marching Mizzou band for being a highlight of the game and the day. We drove from Minnesota for the game, and were not about to leave early from the only game we will be able to attend all year. As the game became further out of reach and the stands emptied rapidly in the second half, our great Mizzou band continued to play and to help keep our Missouri spirits up. Those of us who stayed and continued to cheer on our Tigers truly appreciated the band hanging in there and inspiring us until the very end!  Thank you, Marching Mizzou for staying with us to the end and for making us proud to be Tiger fans and alums!

Cindy Hall Smith, BSN ‘80, MD ’85

Walter Smith, BFA ’81

Minneapolis

Not the faintest

I just heard of a new science game show, Head Games, [on the Science Channel] that will show fainting goats. While investigating these goats, I was led to a YouTube video and discovered that these are the same goats my father, Dr. Paul Zollman, BS Ag ’44, DVM ‘50, had when I was growing up.

I looked into what causes their “fainting” and found out that the goats are bred for meat and have a condition called myotonia congenita, which produces heavy muscling. “Fainting” is really a misnomer, for the goats never lose consciousness, but their muscles freeze and they can fall over when startled or excited. One site lists their breed name as Zajchyk or Anna Garmash, which both sound central European. My father said something about Gypsy bringing the goats to America with their traveling shows, the falling down as part of the entertainment, but I am recalling that from memory.

I do know that some people used to come out to the barn at Institute Hills Farm at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester [Minn.] and honk their car horns to startle the goats and watch them fall over. Since I have lived away from Rochester [Minn.] and my father passed away a year ago, this topic has not been in family conversation for a while.

Anne Z. Hasiuk, MA ’86 

Bloomington, Ind.